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Posts Tagged ‘perspective’

Faith and History

March 16, 2014 Leave a comment

A few years ago, I posted a blog on Faith and Science which elicited a very logical and detailed response from a reader of the opposite opinion. I appreciated his comments because he made them in a dignified and logical way and expressed what seem to be many people’s reservations about Christianity and religion in general these days.

The first thing that I noted though, was that he wasn’t really countering my discussion on faith and science. Instead, he was addressing a separate issue of faith and history. You see, science and religion are fields which seek truth about very different aspects of the same reality. Where science seeks to understand how the universe works and how to control it, religion seeks to explain the meaning of the universe and Who or What created and already controls it. Science deals more with concrete realities while religion handles the realities that we can’t put our hands on.

History is an interesting topic because it becomes something of a meeting point for the two fields. Science uses its concrete methodologies to determine realities of the past, and many religions claim a God who has actively participated in history. Christianity, more than any other religion (that I know of), lays itself on the line in the historical stage. As a Christian, I believe in a God who sent his son, Jesus of Nazareth, as human being to live, die, rise from the dead, and ascend into heaven. If those things did not historically happen, then my faith is false. What I have noticed though, is that the larger issue is that both faith and science have tended to overstep their bounds in trying to express their discoveries about reality. As I discussed in the original post, Christianity, and Catholicism in particular, has a rap for the insistence by church leaders in various centuries that certain physical realities were revealed by God in the bible and therefore irrefutable, when God was simply using the terms and culture of the current society to express the reality of his love and faithfulness. Conversely, scientists who make discoveries or develop theories about physical realities have on occasion claimed that their work points to a reality that either has no place or no need for God. However, the philosophical implications of those statements are well beyond the expertise and field of a scientist.   When both of these flawed perspectives make their way into historical discussions, the process generally results in tainted religion, science, and history.

If you have some time, please read the blog response to my initial blog below as well as my follow-up and let me know what you think. I’m sure there is much more perspective to be added on both sides of the argument and I welcome the discussion…

Read more…

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Remember You Are Dust… Even Now

March 5, 2014 Leave a comment

Even though Ash Wednesday is not a holy day of obligation, it is often more crowded than Sunday services. I don’t know what inspires so many people who don’t come to mass when it’s expected of them to come to celebrate the one day out of the year when someone intentionally puts soot on their face, but I have an idea… and that idea gives me hope…

I think everybody who walks into church has a unique history and motivation which has brought them there, but I have a suspicion that more of those unique motivations find their way into the pews on Ash Wednesday because they long for something that those ashes offer. Some of the people may not be a practicing Catholic while others are. Some of them may not care what is expected of them as a Christian while others do. Some of them may have gotten too busy for weekly mass while others haven’t. What is different about Ash Wednesday though, and maybe what they remember about it that keeps them all coming back, is the stark reminder that it offers of something that we all know. This life doesn’t last forever. Once a year, we allow a man to put the burnt remnants of palm branches on our foreheads and remind us that we will die. “Remember you are dust and to dust you will return.”

We long to hear this though and we need to hear this, but we need it with the perspective that only Christ can give. This undeniable reality is present every day in our lives and in our media. It is portrayed as a tragedy or as a statistic or even as entertainment, but our Church reminds us that the reality of this “dust” is a sign of hope and an invitation. The first reading from the second chapter of the book of Joel is a prime example.

“Yet even now,” says the LORD, “return to me with all your heart, with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning;

and rend your hearts and not your garments.” Return to the LORD, your God, for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love, and repents of evil.

Who knows whether he will not turn and repent, and leave a blessing behind him, a cereal offering and a drink offering for the LORD, your God?

Blow the trumpet in Zion; sanctify a fast; call a solemn assembly;

gather the people. Sanctify the congregation; assemble the elders; gather the children, even nursing infants. Let the bridegroom leave his room, and the bride her chamber.

Between the vestibule and the altar let the priests, the ministers of the LORD, weep and say, “Spare thy people, O LORD, and make not thy heritage a reproach, a byword among the nations. Why should they say among the peoples, `Where is their God?’

Then the LORD became jealous for his land, and had pity on his people.”

The last few times that I have heard it or read it, all of my attention for the better part of the day was wrapped around two words at the very beginning — “Even now”. Joel was talking to a people who were on the brink of disaster, who had gotten themselves into a pretty bad place with God, but his message was not condemnation, but invitation. He was telling the people, “IT’S NOT TOO LATE! EVEN NOW YOU CAN STILL BE FORGIVEN! EVEN NOW GOD WANTS TO MAKE YOU WHOLE. EVEN NOW GOD WANTS TO RESTORE THE RELATIONSHIP THAT YOU WERE MADE FOR.” And that is exactly what happened. There is plenty of death and destruction in the Old Testament, but God is always looking to save His people. The same is true now. Christ invites us “even now” no matter where we have been to return to him, not so that he can save us from death and destruction in this world, but so that he give us eternal life with him in the next.

Lent isn’t about finding a way to make yourself miserable for 40 days. It’s about setting your priorities: God first, everything else later. We make sacrifices to God as a reminder that He is more important than the things we sacrifice. Moreover, it becomes an opportunity for us to unite our sufferings with Christ who sacrificed his whole life because he loved us and he loved the Father that much.

Ash Wednesday is an invitation. Each person decides in their own way how or if they will accept, but it brings me hope to see so many people in the pews listening to God’s offer and bowing their heads to be reminded of their frailty.

AMDG

P.S. Another great example of that invitation is the song that is probably most synonymous with the service. I challenge you to pray the words of this song…

1. We rise again from ashes,
from the good we’ve failed to do.
We rise again from ashes,
to create ourselves anew.
If all our world is ashes,
then must our lives be true,
an offering of ashes, an offering to you.

2. We offer you our failures,
we offer you attempts,
the gifts not fully given,
the dreams not fully dreamt.
Give our stumblings direction,
give our visions wider view,
an offering of ashes, an offering to you.

3. Then rise again from ashes,
let healing come to pain,
though spring has turned to winter,
and sunshine turned to rain.
The rain we’ll use for growing,
and create the world anew
from an offering of ashes, an offering to you.

4. Thanks be to the Father,
who made us like himself.
Thanks be to his Son,
who saved us by his death.
Thanks be to the Spirit
who creates the world anew
from an offering of ashes, an offering to you.

What Do You Care About?

July 15, 2012 Leave a comment

It is rather easy these days for me to find myself concerned with a myriad of priorities at work, among friends and with hobbies that I pursue along the side. I keep my days pretty busy because there is just so much that I want to get done. Work exhausts me during the week and on the weekend I do everything that I can to recharge through all the activities that I enjoy the most. I keep a pretty packed schedule, but I think the part that bogs me down the most is all of the little frustrations, side-bars and trivial pursuits (not the game; I think the game is awesome) that I intermix with the bigger things.

It seems like I could relate my mind to a computer. I may have one or two applications open on the screen, but I keep about 20 hidden on the bottom task bar running in the background and slowing down the processing. 20 is actually a pretty accurate, if even small, number when regarding my mind (or my actual computer). The problem is that I never end up giving my full attention, my full “processing power,” to the task at hand. Even when I’m done with the computer, I don’t close the applications, I just “hibernate” so that when I turn it on again, the processes are all there running and ready for my attention. Similarly, at the end of the day, I usually go to bed and “hibernate” for the evening, only to wake up in the morning concerning myself with all the same nonessential background processes.

When I notice this reduction in processing power in my computer, I usually save and close out my applications and reboot the computer.  With my mind, I can’t just choose to stop thinking about things and temporarily shut off my brain. The attempt would probably not have the intended affect… What does help me though, is a little perspective. One of the things that I love about being a Catholic is that I have 2,000 years of heroes to learn from. Not only do I have the example of their lives to guide me in my struggle to live a holy life, many of them have left a legacy of their written and spoken wisdom to help me gain the perspective that I need to reinvigorate my attempts. Here is a pearl from one of those heroes (A heroine in fact and a Doctor of the Church)

“Remember you have only one soul; that you have only one death to die; that you have only one life, which is short and has to be lived by you alone; and there is only one glory, which is eternal. If you do this, there will be a great many things about which you care nothing.” ~ St. Teresa of Avila

These words are a piercing reminder that many of my regular pursuits are, in fact, trivial; that many of the items and activities which I spend my brainpower (and willpower) on are, in fact, much less important than I make them out to be.  That there are a great many processes which my brain can close and be none-the-worse. There are a great many things for which I SHOULD care nothing.

This doesn’t necessarily close those applications in my head and in my heart, but the more I think about and process the truth of those words and the effects of them, the smaller and smaller those other things become in my life and less of my attention is distracted from the truly important things which are usually not things at all…

AMDG